Holistic Practices

Jul 9, 2018 | in Holistic Practices

Pranayama, most commonly known as deep breathing exercises, is a compound word with Pran and Ayama. Pran means breathing or respiration and Ayama means extension or expansion. Thus, Pranayama means extension of breath or life span. During pranayama the mind must concentrate on breathing process. According to the father of Modern Science Yoga, acquiring the skill of controlling and regulating the inhalation, exhalation and retention of breath is called “Pranayama”. Life exists in different systems (such as digestive system, nervous systems, circulatory systems etc.) and organs. Pranayama strengthens, protects and energizes them. If pranayama is practiced on a systematic and regular basis, almost all the diseases can be prevented and cured. It acts like a gateway to higher yoga and leads to realize your inner self. Also you don’t no need to spend a lot of time on making simple healthy recipes.

5 Most Effective Pranayamas : Deep Breathing Exercises

pranyama diagramThere pranayamas are simple, but very effective tool for relaxation. These simple deep breathing exercises must be done taking care of the preventive measures. Certain people suffering from delicate diseases must consult their physician before practicing these exercises. After practicing these, it is recommended to practice the acupressure therapy to enjoy all the benefits of acupressure points on your palms and feet.

Jul 9, 2018 | in Holistic Practices

praying mantis kung fu logoNote: the Chinese terms in this article are in expressed in Cantonese.

 

Seven Star Praying Mantis kung fu has, as a part of its syllabus, health enhancing breathing exercises called (in Cantonese) Law Hon Gong which, when translated, means "The Monk’s Strength". Acquired from the fabled Shaolin Temple, these chi gong-styled breathing exercises have meditative, health enhancing, strength building, and martial training aspects to them.

 

The Law Hon Gong movements and postures combine to a total of eighteen. They are believed to be the chi gong movements the Shaolin temple monks used to increase the strength of their martial arts.

 

Although at present there is no written history as to which of the Seven Star Praying Mantis teacher brought the Law Hon Gong into the system it is thought to be fifth generation Fan Yuk Tung. He was known as "Giant Fan" as he weighted about three hundred pounds...

Sep 5, 2016 | in Holistic Practices

When Benjamin Franklin said, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure,” he wasn’t speaking about martial arts injuries. However, the statement’s wisdom applies to many common martial arts injuries. Prevention must be a priority for practitioners, and that generally comes down to patience and proper training through strengthening exercises, stretching, stance and weight training, and internal and external toughening of the muscles and connective tissues...

Jul 17, 2016 | in Holistic Practices

Tai Chi, a form of Chinese martial arts often practiced for its health benefits, may be an effective treatment option for patients who suffer from dizziness and balance disorders (also known as vestibular disorders).

In a paper presented at the 2009 American Academy of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) Annual Meeting & OTO EXPO in San Diego, researchers evaluated the utility of Tai Chi...

Jul 17, 2016 | in Holistic Practices

kombuchaBenefits Including Gut Health, Immunity, Cancer-Fighter, and even helps with Weight Loss? 184 Healthy organic kombucha superfood probiotic drink in glass on white background by Cat Ebeling & Mike Geary co-authors of the best-sellers: The Fat Burning Kitchen & The Top 101 Foods that Fight Aging I actually fell in love with the tangy, sweet/sour, bubbly awesomeness about ten years ago, and have been addicted ever since. Barely a day goes by when I don’t pick up a bottle or pour myself a glass from my home brew. It has an amazing taste, and really does make you feel happier and energetic...

 

May 1, 2016 | in Holistic Practices

li ching-yuen

According to the official records, herbalist Li Ching-Yuen was born in China in 1677 (although he himself claimed that he was born in 1736). Throughout his long life, he constantly practiced herbalism and martial arts. In 1930, the New York Times newspaper printed an article in which they published official Chinese government documents that were uncovered. These documents, dating back to 1827, contained official congratulations on Li Ching-Yuen's 150th birthday. Later documents, dating back to 1877, contained official congratulations on his 200th birthday.

How did he do that?