The Science of M.A.

Mar 10, 2018 | in The Science of M.A.
Abstract
We live in two worlds, one on either side of our skin. The very survival ofthe Ninja or the hunting wild cat is dependent on their alertness and presence in both worlds. Body-Mindfulness is what I call this embodied awareness and aliveness. Its full expression is found in martial arts mastery. Body-Mindfulness is a calm, open state of present-time awareness ofinner and outer body experiences, including sensory stimulations such as pressure, touch, stretch, temperature, pain, tingling, physical movement and position in space, visual, auditory and olfactory impressions. An integral aspect of Body-Mindfulness is fascial awareness: the capacity to sense our body-wide network of myofascial tissue in stillness and in movement. We can develop this skill and build the elastic potential of the connective tissue system (Chapter l) in fine, coordinated, controlled martial training such as tai ji, karate and kung fu forms , then actualise this controlled power in explosive high speed movements. The quest for ultimate power and awareness in self-defence and attack is an ancient one. Two thousand years ago the masters, who trained tendon power, knew something intuitively that science has only recently validated. Shaolin training and tai ji masters both recognised the vital importance of conditioning and strengthening the fascia and connective tissues to build and protect the body's Qi energy (life force). Since research has shown that it is the organ of stability and the seat of our proprioception, the fascia has finally received the attention it deserves. In fact, most musculo-skeletal injuries involve inappropriate loading of the connective tissues and fascia, not the muscles. Therefore, the fascia must be considered an important factor in peak performance and training. The pioneers in the Figure 16.1 Shaolin KungFu training develops fascial strength SiFu Pierre Yves Roqueferre new fascia research define fascia more broadly than traditionally. They recognise fascia as the soft tissue component of the connective tissue system permeating the entire human body as one interconnected tensional network. It includes tendons , ligaments, joint and organ capsules, membranes , dense sheets and softer collagenous layers Chapter 16 (Chapter 1). In the new Fascial Fitness approach there is an emphasis on developing elasticity, of acknowledging the stress-responsive nature and tensional integrity of fascial tissue, of specifically conditioning and hydrating the fascia for appropriate stress-loading, as well as appreciating its recently discovered proprioceptive qualities (Chapter 11). This chapter explores some of the implications of the current research and how Fascial Fitness , attained through physical training and Body-Mindfulness, is one of the secrets for success in martial arts mastery.
Mar 9, 2018 | in The Science of M.A.

Abstract

Martial arts are practiced in both amateur and in high professional level, stimulating scientific research in several areas of knowledge, including biomechanics. The main purpose of this review is to present the biomechanics methods used in the study of martial arts. The great importance of this study is the compilation of information science of what has already been analyzed under the biomechanics aspects related to martial arts and how this has been done. The methodology was directed to the revision of literature starting from articles, books, and seminars. From the collection of bibliographic surveys, it has been concluded that depending on the parameters studied e.g.: reaction time, speed, strength, power, among others, there is the need to apply one or more methods since there are situations in which only one biomechanical method will not be enough to answer the pointed question. It is also concluded that the investigated studies in the presented review showed the character of a descriptive examination, not directly applied to the development of techniques used on different modalities.
by Thomas (Tom) Davies
Dec 3, 2016 | in The Science of M.A.
Sep 5, 2016 | in The Science of M.A.
by Dr. Peter J. Scordilis
Oct 21, 2015 | in The Science of M.A.